First in Europe for Asbestos

rimozione amianto.jpg

Perhaps not everyone knows that the town of Paese in the Province of Treviso is the site of the largest asbestos dump in Europe. Getting rid of asbestos costs more than 50 million Euros a year.

The dump has capacity for 460,000 cubic metres of asbestos and is only a few hundred metres from a residential area.

Asbestos fibres are almost invisible. They are so thin that you need 335,000 to get the diameter of a hair, and they cause  pleuric mesotelioma, otherwise known as lung cancer.

The incubation period can last up to 40 years and the peak of mortality is expected to be between 2013 and 2015.

In view of the situation without hope of the Province of Treviso, I’d take advantage to construct a few incinerators and a dump for nuclear waste. Obviously without evaluating the environmental impact, following local tradition.

Here’s some advice for other citizens: if your neighbour has an asbestos roof on his garage, don’t go and denounce him.

If you do that, apart from inhaling the slivers of dust at the moment that it is removed, you’ll be obliging the whole of Italy to inhale it directly from the truck that is carrying it to Treviso.

Posted by Beppe Grillo at 02:10 AM in | Comments (10) | Comments in Italian (translated) Post a comment | Sign up | Send to a friend | | GrilloNews | listen_it_it.gifListen | TrackBack (0) |
View blog opinions
| | Condividi



Comments

Contrary to popular belief, a mesothelioma diagnosis doesn’t necessarily mean a death sentence. Fortunately, for us all, there is a gleam of hope encapsulated in certain facts about mesothelioma survivors we would like to share with you.

Posted by: mesotheliomasurvivor | December 12, 2007 10:41 PM


Dear Beppe,
I am very pleased to send you this message of support for the causes you are fighting for. I live in London and have an International Business background and having studied how big business operates and kills all the local competition in collusion with the media and politicians, I have decided to get into classical music singing!!!!
I really appreciate all your points and also realise the struggle you face from the corrupt establishment to get the real news available to everyone.
keep up with your job of real info provider.
Maurizio Piga
p.s when will you start your own Democratic Party?
surely many people will appreciate your ideas!!!

Posted by: Maurizio Piga | February 13, 2006 01:07 PM


Cricket man, I am new to your blog but I can see you have been busy. Asbestosis and mesotelioma are indeed serious conditions. Your comments however have an air of panic and histerics, occasional exposure is harmless. It is occupational exposure where these medical conditions are most common. You will see in 2015 there will be no epidemic asbestos deaths.
If exposure is based on airbourne particles like you explained it would seem logical to bury the stuff back to the earth where it came from, yes?

Posted by: GiancoG. | February 10, 2006 08:55 PM


Italian upset: Focaccia 1, Big Mac 0
By Ian Fisher The New York Times

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2006


ALTAMURA, Italy Somehow the tale of how the city with the best bread in Italy forced its McDonald's out of business might never have been told, though now it is spilling out.

All the elements of a McDonald's morality play remain relevant today: supposed corporate arrogance; traditional food triumphing over food product; a David in the form of a humble and graying baker named DiGesù against an expansionist American Goliath.

And, inevitably, it includes the French.

It was the leftist and Amero-skeptic French newspaper, Libération, that last week wrote the fullest account of what happened in Altamura, in southern Italy, where the road signs welcome visitors to "The City of Bread." (The poet Horace liked it, 2,043 years ago.) The article began like a triumphant cold war novel:

"The long red mat was taken away secretly during the night," it reported, noting, too, that the "enormous M" over Piazza Zanardelli was "also packed up surreptitiously." The windows were covered "like a shroud on the victim of a culinary battlefield."

"Today," Libération said, "there are no longer Big Macs, Chicken McNuggets or industrial fries in Altamura."

What Libération neglected to say - as have most of the other articles in an irresistible landslide of coverage in print and on the Web - is that the McDonald's closed down in December 2002. The paper spoke vaguely of happenings a "number" of months ago.

But no matter: The protagonists here in Altamura - as well as many others - are thrilled for the belated attention, and the distinction as the city whose food was so good that it closed down a McDonald's without really trying.

"What took place was a small war between us and McDonald's," said Onofrio Pepe, a retired journalist who founded an association here devoted to local delicacies. "Our bullets were focaccia. And sausage. And bread. It was a peaceful war, without any spilling of blood."

Pepe and several like-minded citizens of Altamura, with 65,000 residents, 40 kilometers, or 25 miles, south of the Adriatic port city of Bari, made up one wing of the army. Their reasons for fighting were largely pride, against what they said was ill-executed intrusion, in their food - which includes a local mushroom called the cardoncello, focaccia, mozzarella and, most of all, a coarse-grain bread famous for millennia around Italy. The bread is protected as unique in European Union regulations, which note that Horace called it, in 37 B.C., "far the best bread to be had, so good that the wise traveler takes a supply of it for his onward journey."

When the McDonald's first opened in early 2001, Pepe said he was not opposed to it, and even supported the 25 or so new jobs created. "In the beginning," he said, "it seemed like modernization."

Then the modern seemed to take over: McDonald's erected the huge arches on a pole near the old town center, jarringly near the 13th-century cathedral, beaming yellow neon 24 hours a day (and disturbing, Pepe said, little falcons that nested in nearby trees).

"It gave the sense of a city being occupied," he said. "It was considered a sort of challenge. Not a challenge to confront in anger, but with a smile. They brought in their products, and we had ours."

So his group held low-key protests to highlight local food, as another front on the war opened, very much unplanned.

A fourth-generation baker, Luca DiGesù, now 35, opened Antica casa DiGesù, a small bakery right next to McDonald's. DiGesù said he had no intention of challenging McDonald's. He merely hoped to shake free some customers attracted to the spot by the novelty.

"I was afraid of McDonald's," he said, speaking in his bakery on Tuesday afternoon. "I was afraid we would be completely glossed over. I was afraid no one would even notice us."

For awhile, McDonald's drew in the customers of Altamura. "In the beginning," DiGesù said, "McDonald's was McDonald's."

But soon there was a migration of locals who preferred their own version of fast food: hunks of the thick focaccia like the dozen that DiGesù was tending in the oven as he spoke. Part of the reason seemed economic: DiGesù said that a big slice of focaccia cost the same as a single McDonald's hamburger. It was also, clearly, preference.

"It wasn't that my shop was full," he said. "But people slowly started showing up more and more at my place."

McDonald's began fighting back: It offered school trips to visit the kitchens; free access to the restaurant for children's birthday parties; coupons for children; even a television for customers to watch soccer. Nothing seemed to work.

"They'd watch the games, and as soon as it was over go out and get focaccia," Pepe said.

Finally, in December 2002, after less than two years in operation, the McDonald's of Altamura closed shop, according to the company, for lack of profitability.

The huge space is now divided by a jeans store and a bank. DiGesù smiled broadly when asked how he felt that the Italian media - which missed the story three years ago - is now hailing him as a modern-day David.

"I like it," he said. "McDonald's is big. I am small. Right now it is 1-0."

Food snobs, patriots of all sorts, and antiglobalists will all read what they like into the fate of McDonald's here. But unlike some anti-McDonald's activists in France, the people of Altamura say their issue was not anti-Americanism.

"The difference between France and here is that in France it is ideological," Pepe said. "Here it was completely natural. We like America very much."

And, while Italy is at the forefront of the so-called slow food movement, which emphasizes rare and distinct local foods, there seems no overwhelming aversion to McDonald's - judging at least by how crowded with Italians they often are.

"In no way is this a defeat for McDonald's," contended Mario Resca, president of McDonald's in Italy, saying that he hoped to double the current number of 340 McDonald's here. "If anything, I am proud that the local culture is appreciating its local cuisine because this means that McDonald's has stimulated a healthy competition."

In the end, it seems there may simply be places in the world where McDonald's is out of its depth on every front.

The landlord both for McDonald's and DiGesù happened to be DiGesù's brother-in-law.

The brother-in-law gave DiGesù a good deal on the rent. He did not do so for McDonald's.

Then there is the local food - cheap and overwhelmingly good - and the people who have eaten it for centuries and consider it as much their tradition as their history. Odd as it might seem in a corporate boardroom, they put no value on a McDonald's in Altamura.

"The majority couldn't imagine McDonald's becoming an integral part of their lives," said Patrick Girondi, 48, an entrepreneur from Chicago who has lived here for 15 years. "McDonald's didn't get beat by a baker. McDonald's got beat by a culture."



Peter Kiefer contributed reporting for this article from Rome and Altamura.

ALTAMURA, Italy Somehow the tale of how the city with the best bread in Italy forced its McDonald's out of business might never have been told, though now it is spilling out.

All the elements of a McDonald's morality play remain relevant today: supposed corporate arrogance; traditional food triumphing over food product; a David in the form of a humble and graying baker named DiGesù against an expansionist American Goliath.

And, inevitably, it includes the French.

It was the leftist and Amero-skeptic French newspaper, Libération, that last week wrote the fullest account of what happened in Altamura, in southern Italy, where the road signs welcome visitors to "The City of Bread." (The poet Horace liked it, 2,043 years ago.) The article began like a triumphant cold war novel:

"The long red mat was taken away secretly during the night," it reported, noting, too, that the "enormous M" over Piazza Zanardelli was "also packed up surreptitiously." The windows were covered "like a shroud on the victim of a culinary battlefield."

"Today," Libération said, "there are no longer Big Macs, Chicken McNuggets or industrial fries in Altamura."

What Libération neglected to say - as have most of the other articles in an irresistible landslide of coverage in print and on the Web - is that the McDonald's closed down in December 2002. The paper spoke vaguely of happenings a "number" of months ago.

But no matter: The protagonists here in Altamura - as well as many others - are thrilled for the belated attention, and the distinction as the city whose food was so good that it closed down a McDonald's without really trying.

"What took place was a small war between us and McDonald's," said Onofrio Pepe, a retired journalist who founded an association here devoted to local delicacies. "Our bullets were focaccia. And sausage. And bread. It was a peaceful war, without any spilling of blood."

Pepe and several like-minded citizens of Altamura, with 65,000 residents, 40 kilometers, or 25 miles, south of the Adriatic port city of Bari, made up one wing of the army. Their reasons for fighting were largely pride, against what they said was ill-executed intrusion, in their food - which includes a local mushroom called the cardoncello, focaccia, mozzarella and, most of all, a coarse-grain bread famous for millennia around Italy. The bread is protected as unique in European Union regulations, which note that Horace called it, in 37 B.C., "far the best bread to be had, so good that the wise traveler takes a supply of it for his onward journey."

When the McDonald's first opened in early 2001, Pepe said he was not opposed to it, and even supported the 25 or so new jobs created. "In the beginning," he said, "it seemed like modernization."

Then the modern seemed to take over: McDonald's erected the huge arches on a pole near the old town center, jarringly near the 13th-century cathedral, beaming yellow neon 24 hours a day (and disturbing, Pepe said, little falcons that nested in nearby trees).

"It gave the sense of a city being occupied," he said. "It was considered a sort of challenge. Not a challenge to confront in anger, but with a smile. They brought in their products, and we had ours."

So his group held low-key protests to highlight local food, as another front on the war opened, very much unplanned.

A fourth-generation baker, Luca DiGesù, now 35, opened Antica casa DiGesù, a small bakery right next to McDonald's. DiGesù said he had no intention of challenging McDonald's. He merely hoped to shake free some customers attracted to the spot by the novelty.

"I was afraid of McDonald's," he said, speaking in his bakery on Tuesday afternoon. "I was afraid we would be completely glossed over. I was afraid no one would even notice us."

For awhile, McDonald's drew in the customers of Altamura. "In the beginning," DiGesù said, "McDonald's was McDonald's."

But soon there was a migration of locals who preferred their own version of fast food: hunks of the thick focaccia like the dozen that DiGesù was tending in the oven as he spoke. Part of the reason seemed economic: DiGesù said that a big slice of focaccia cost the same as a single McDonald's hamburger. It was also, clearly, preference.

"It wasn't that my shop was full," he said. "But people slowly started showing up more and more at my place."

McDonald's began fighting back: It offered school trips to visit the kitchens; free access to the restaurant for children's birthday parties; coupons for children; even a television for customers to watch soccer. Nothing seemed to work.

"They'd watch the games, and as soon as it was over go out and get focaccia," Pepe said.

Finally, in December 2002, after less than two years in operation, the McDonald's of Altamura closed shop, according to the company, for lack of profitability.

The huge space is now divided by a jeans store and a bank. DiGesù smiled broadly when asked how he felt that the Italian media - which missed the story three years ago - is now hailing him as a modern-day David.

"I like it," he said. "McDonald's is big. I am small. Right now it is 1-0."

Food snobs, patriots of all sorts, and antiglobalists will all read what they like into the fate of McDonald's here. But unlike some anti-McDonald's activists in France, the people of Altamura say their issue was not anti-Americanism.

"The difference between France and here is that in France it is ideological," Pepe said. "Here it was completely natural. We like America very much."

And, while Italy is at the forefront of the so-called slow food movement, which emphasizes rare and distinct local foods, there seems no overwhelming aversion to McDonald's - judging at least by how crowded with Italians they often are.

"In no way is this a defeat for McDonald's," contended Mario Resca, president of McDonald's in Italy, saying that he hoped to double the current number of 340 McDonald's here. "If anything, I am proud that the local culture is appreciating its local cuisine because this means that McDonald's has stimulated a healthy competition."

In the end, it seems there may simply be places in the world where McDonald's is out of its depth on every front.

The landlord both for McDonald's and DiGesù happened to be DiGesù's brother-in-law.

The brother-in-law gave DiGesù a good deal on the rent. He did not do so for McDonald's.

Then there is the local food - cheap and overwhelmingly good - and the people who have eaten it for centuries and consider it as much their tradition as their history. Odd as it might seem in a corporate boardroom, they put no value on a McDonald's in Altamura.

"The majority couldn't imagine McDonald's becoming an integral part of their lives," said Patrick Girondi, 48, an entrepreneur from Chicago who has lived here for 15 years. "McDonald's didn't get beat by a baker. McDonald's got beat by a culture."



Peter Kiefer contributed reporting for this article from Rome and Altamura.

ALTAMURA, Italy Somehow the tale of how the city with the best bread in Italy forced its McDonald's out of business might never have been told, though now it is spilling out.

All the elements of a McDonald's morality play remain relevant today: supposed corporate arrogance; traditional food triumphing over food product; a David in the form of a humble and graying baker named DiGesù against an expansionist American Goliath.

And, inevitably, it includes the French.

It was the leftist and Amero-skeptic French newspaper, Libération, that last week wrote the fullest account of what happened in Altamura, in southern Italy, where the road signs welcome visitors to "The City of Bread." (The poet Horace liked it, 2,043 years ago.) The article began like a triumphant cold war novel:

"The long red mat was taken away secretly during the night," it reported, noting, too, that the "enormous M" over Piazza Zanardelli was "also packed up surreptitiously." The windows were covered "like a shroud on the victim of a culinary battlefield."

"Today," Libération said, "there are no longer Big Macs, Chicken McNuggets or industrial fries in Altamura."

What Libération neglected to say - as have most of the other articles in an irresistible landslide of coverage in print and
http://guerrillaradio.iobloggo.com/

Posted by: alessandra arrigoni | February 10, 2006 01:42 AM


It's too ad the environment is always an after thought consideration. Good luck with that Asbestos mess, its nasty.
Raymond B
www.voteswagon.com

Posted by: Raymond B | February 3, 2006 04:15 AM


@ ALEX
I'm completly ignorant about this, and I trust you if you said that asbest can be innocous if property removed, but... I don't think it will happen in our Country! Most probably that our asbest will unsafely removed, and the citizens will be exposed to high risks. That's is Italy!

Posted by: Raffaella Biferale | February 2, 2006 03:33 PM


I think that in Italy ... if Grillo didn't write in this "panic-way" people and public opinion wouldn't take in consideration the Town condition.
...

Dante

Posted by: Dante | February 2, 2006 10:56 AM


Alex, I agree in principle with wath you write. However I think that the point to stress in Grillo's article, is that the landfill was done without the evaluation of environmental impact be done.
If this is the case, you will agree that this is a major source of concern, isn't it?

Regards

Posted by: Luigi Pacetti | February 2, 2006 09:21 AM


Beppe - I understand your concerns and the need to inform people about the danger of asbestos; I am a devoted reader, but if you want to keep this blog you should get informed before writing of issues that you know little about.
First, mesotelioma is terrible, but it is not lung cancer. It is indeed a terrible condition that involves the diaphram.
Second, Asbestos is very dangerous, but only if it is not properly handled. Please do convince your neighbour to get rid of the asbestos on his roof...if this is properly done it will benefit him and you. If asbestos is properly removed there won't be releases of fibres.
Third, if asbetos is not friable and you don't mess with it won't be dangerous. So asbestos can still be OK (sometimes).
I don't know the condition of the landfill and it is certanly scary that it is so close to people...but please try to inform your readers instead of create panic.

By the way...I'm an environmental engineer and I work with these things.

Thanks and keep this blog going.

Posted by: Alex Buccilli | February 2, 2006 04:50 AM


Check out this article about the Iranian President's visit to a Nuclear Site
Asbestos is bad but Nuclear poetntial in those hands could be worse
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,183413,00.html

Posted by: lj | February 2, 2006 03:24 AM


Post a comment


Beppe Grillo's Blog is an open space for you to use so that we can come face to face directly. As your comment is published immediately, there's no time for filters to check it out. Thus the Blog's usefulness depends on your cooperation and it makes you the only ones responsible for the content and the resulting outcomes.

Information to be read before using Beppe Grillo's Blog

The following are not allowed:
1. messages without the email address of the sender
2. anonymous messages
3. advertising messages
4. messages containing offensive language
5. messages containing obscene language
6. messages with racist or sexist content
7. messages with content that constitutes a violation of Italian Law (incitement to commit a crime, to violence, libel etc.)

However, the owner of the Blog can delete messages at any moment and for any reason.
The owner of the Blog cannot be held responsible for any messages that may damage the rights of third parties Maximum comment length is 2,000 characters.
If you have any doubts read "How to use the blog".

Post a comment (English please!)


First name and Surname*:

Email Address*:
We remind you that anonymous messages (without real first name and surname) will be cancelled.
URL:


* Compulsory fields



Send to a friend

Send this message to *


Your Email Address *


Message (optional)


* Compulsory fields


Beppe Grillo Meetups

meetup.jpg
Groups 372 Members 76.596
Cities 281 Countries 10

Books and DVDs

grillorama

Check out the books and DVDs of Beppe Grillo (service in Italian)

Initiatives


Terra Reloaded DVD

Clean Up Parliament

Map of Power


Awards

Webby award
14th Annual Webby Awards Official Honoree Selections

Interviews


Tegenlicht - Beppe Grillo's Interview

"De toekomst van Europa volgens Beppe Grillo"

(Tegenlicht TV)

International Press Review

The New Yorker
"Beppe's Inferno"

Times
"The Comic Who Shook Italy"
(The video | Related post)

Forbes
"The Web Celeb 25"
(Related post)

BBC
"Meeting Italy's silenced satirist"

AlJazeera
People and power: "Beppe's Blog"

TIME magazine
TIME.com's First Annual Blog Index
(related post)