Fabullo

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Fabullo is a three year old boy from Orio Canavese. He was born with a serious cardiac illness. To keep him alive he has needed two operations. After the second he had a cerebral ischemia. He became like a vegetable. !6 months have gone by. Now, even though he has spastic tetraplegic cerebral palsy, he can interact with people and move his head. However he canít move from one place to another, or move his body or sit up or turn over in bed.
Itís possible that with the right treatment, Fabullo could return to normal. But treatment has a cost. Money is what makes the difference for the happiness of a child and his family. Fabullo has been examined by Dr. Bifulco of Therapies4kids (Florida) who gave his family some hope. The cost of an initial period of 3 monthís treatment is 120,000 dollars. To do this he should be setting off with his mother on 17 October.
Letís help Fabullo with a donation.
Click her to read the details ofhow to donate and to see how much has been collected..
Fabullo is not alone. There are many children in Italy who go abroad to find treatments that they canít get here. The story of the journey of hope is repeated each time, with a collection that relies on the good nature of the people.
Whereís the State? Whatís the use of our taxes, if they canít save our children? 120,000 dollars is the salary of any old third-rate local cabinet member. Italy of waste is also the Italy of those who are abandoned.
Letís help Fabullo run around in a meadow. Iíll keep you informed.
Have a look at Fabulloís blog.

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Posted by Beppe Grillo at 07:38 PM in | Comments (7) | Comments in Italian (translated) Post a comment | Sign up | Send to a friend | | GrilloNews | listen_it_it.gifListen |
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Hello again. I did not mean to offend anyone regarding my using Emilia Romagna as an average region in Italy, but it is there that I am from and frequent and know the best. I do, though, know Italy fairly well and have been to see my grandmother's sisters, my aunt's, in their healthcare facilites in La Campagna, namely in and around Salerno, and was equally impressed. I am aware that Emilia is somewhat ahead of other parts of Italy because it is one of the wealthier regions, but the ideal of what should be, I feel, prevails thoughout. I am going to use myself as an example of something. I go to our familial home is Italy for a few months every year. I have cancer. Before leaving, after being in the USA for 8 months or so, I always do my bloods, and the numbers are always bad. The cancer moving around within..red blood cell levels off, white blood cells off, hemoglobin messed up, you name it. Last year, prior to leaving my doc wanted to put me on different meds. I refused because even if the numbers were not what we wanted, I was dealing with the side effects. After a few months, returning to the USA, I did my bloods again, first thing, and amazingly, every number was better. It is not just the medical care that is important or omnipotent in one's care, but the environment plays, I believe, an equally major part of one's care. Italy is so much more human, real, feeling, embracing, which the USA is not, especially in recent years. The improvement in my health is no coincidence. I call Italy my cure. Yes, the USA is ahead technologically...but sociologically, we are still on Plymouth Rock afraid of the Indians. This is not a good thing. If there could be a medium between the eccesses in the USA and its waste of them, and the humanism and spirit endowed in Italy, albeit through small governemt workers who are 'power happy', we would all be set.
Peace!

Posted by: Gary Casella | April 14, 2008 08:01 PM


Hello again. I did not mean to offend anyone regarding my using Emilia Romagna as an average region in Italy, but it is there that I am from and frequent and know the best. I do, though, know Italy fairly well and have been to see my grandmother's sisters, my aunt's, in their healthcare facilites in La Campagna, namely in and around Salerno, and was equally impressed. I am aware that Emilia is somewhat ahead of other parts of Italy because it is one of the wealthier regions, but the ideal of what should be, I feel, prevails thoughout. I am going to use myself as an example of something. I go to our familial home is Italy for a few months every year. I have cancer. Before leaving, after being in the USA for 8 months or so, I always do my bloods, and the numbers are always bad. The cancer moving around within..red blood cell levels off, white blood cells off, hemoglobin messed up, you name it. Last year, prior to leaving my doc wanted to put me on different meds. I refused because even if the numbers were not what we wanted, I was dealing with the side effects. After a few months, returning to the USA, I did my bloods again, first thing, and amazingly, every number was better. It is not just the medical care that is important or omnipotent in one's care, but the environment plays, I believe, an equally major part of one's care. Italy is so much more human, real, feeling, embracing, which the USA is not, especially in recent years. The improvement in my health is no coincidence. I call Italy my cure. Yes, the USA is ahead technologically...but sociologically, we are still on Plymouth Rock afraid of the Indians. This is not a good thing. If there could be a medium between the eccesses in the USA and its waste of them, and the humanism and spirit endowed in Italy, albeit through small governemt workers who are 'power happy', we would all be set.
Peace!

Posted by: Gary Casella | April 14, 2008 07:59 PM


Scusami per la mia domanda che mostra ignoranza del processo politico itialiano.

Non capisco come il "non voto" incoraggiato da Beppe Grillo possa aiutare il processo democratico di restaurare un po di onesta' nel parlamento italiano.
Il non voto non lascia la decisione nelle mani degli altri?

Vorrei spiegato come il processo, o il meccanismo del non voto puo agire nel rinnovamento parlamentare che Beppe Grillo vuol promuovere?

Posted by: Lorenzo Migliore | April 14, 2008 03:28 PM


Gary, as far as health care goes, almost any country offers better care for their people than the U.S. As far as retirement homes goes perhaps you should go a little bit south of Reggio Emilia and check the retirements homes there. I've never been in Emilia, but from what they tell me and have read, Emilia has some the best health care and social assistence services in Europe. Just to give you an idea of how good things are in that region: Time magazine did a piece on daycare centres in Emilia and deemed them best in the world. Like I said, I've never been in Emilia, but by all accounts that region sounds like another planet compare to what's going on in many other parts of Italy. But of course,if the region embraced privatizition, things may have changed -usually the change is for the worse.

Posted by: LP | April 14, 2008 01:55 AM


Firstly, what a tragic experience for the child and family. Heartbreaking.
Secondly, however, for as many people, adults and children who go to the USA for medical assistance, there are 3 Americans who could not get treatment in the USA. The only cases that the medical association take on 'pro bono' are the ones that are on the TV news, newspapers, the internet, etc. Indeed, I know of many Americans who come to Italy for 'una cura' because the insurance companies do not want to pay for their procedures. In Italy, you have state run medical and private insurance, for those who can pay. In the USA, there are HMO's who make billions in profit and yet turn down more than 50% of procedures that cross their desks. They will ony change their minds if they are 'shamed' into it by an advocate, whether it be a celebrity or a congressperson or the media and for the poor and needy, almost no help at all. At least, in Italy, there is basic care and almost cost free medication for all!!! Italy, as in every other country, the wealthier the better. I will say, though, having 3 cousins who are doctors, 1 in Milano and 2 in Piacenza, that the amount of patients they are required to have is astronomical! My cousin in Milano, a pediatrician, has over 1000 patients and no help because the government in Italy does no pay for secretaries, nurses...etc. I have seen, though, one thing that impresses me greatly about health care in Italy, and that is the health care for the elderly. I have been to 'casa di cura' for the elderly in Emilia and they are clean, friendly, affordable and comfortable. This is almost impossible to find in the USA unless you have $150,000.00 a year!
Moan as you will about your system, but for those of us who spend time in Italy and the USA, I would take the Italian system any day. I know the 'grass is always greener' in somebody else's yard, but look at what you do have.
This summer, I think you should go to some of the towns that offers 'waters' and 'cures' and massage therapy and the like; Salso Maggiore in Terme comes to mind, and see how many foreigners are there, not to mention the more known spas in Tuscany and Umbria and Liguria.
Please, again, look inward as to what you do have and believe me that if the child you discuss was an American and without insurance, unless someone like Barbra Streisand took up that cause, that American child would also go without help. And I traditionally agree with Signore Grillo!?
"Is your glass half empty or half full"?

Posted by: Gary Casella | April 14, 2008 01:13 AM


Another italian shame: having to go abroad to get cures.. The country should invest more money into research and medicine.

Posted by: Jason R. Forbus | April 13, 2008 08:47 PM


che succede?

Posted by: davide di martino | April 13, 2008 08:37 PM


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