Congo reviolé

Stupri_di_massa_in_Congo.jpg
Mass rape in the Congo



The world has stopped in the Congo. A country where there’s a new word: reviolé, raped again.
The biggest mass rape in history is happening in Africa between a news item from Wall Street and a fall in the Nikkei from Tokyo. Ms Muhindo from the “Olame Centre” in the Congo, said: “It is a shame not just for the Congo but for the whole of humanity.”
In the Congo, rape has been a weapon of war since 1996, when five million people died. Since then, it has been endemic. Used by all parties to the conflict.
The West, like the stars, just look on. One of the most important UN bases is found in the Congo. It has 17,000 soldiers. Their official mandate is to use every means to protect the civilians. But they don’t lift a finger.
The central government and the numerous armed groups to the East of the country are in permanent conflict and tens of thousands of women, of any age, are both the prey and the weapons involved in the fighting.
Many of them, having survived the preceding conflicts, are raped once more, “reviolé”.
The law in the Congo does not have the crime of rape. To be raped with a gun or to be shot in the vagina is not mentioned in the criminal code. Vénantie Bisimua, the founder of "Network of Women for the Defence of Rights and Peace" in Congo explains that the government has other priorities. The same as those of the foreign States that eagerly tap in to the Congo’s mineral resources and do nothing.
In Afghanistan and in Iraq there’s fighting for oil. There’s witnessing of the massacres in the Congo so as not to disturb the multinationals and the raw materials.
Anyone wanting to help the women of the Congo can get in touch with " Social Aid For the Elimination of Rape (SAFER)" at the University of Toronto.

Read the article about the “reviolé” in The The Globeandmail.

PS: But wasn’t Topo Gigio Veltroni going to go to the Congo?

Posted by Beppe Grillo at 10:14 AM in | Comments (2) | Comments in Italian (translated) Post a comment | Sign up | Send to a friend | | GrilloNews | listen_it_it.gifListen |
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Comments

To be sure, stories of atrocities like what's happening in the Congo, must be told. But as horrible as the story is, they're once read twice forgotten. We're not affected by them. Bystanders stood by and watched two human beings batter to death another human being. And what did they do? Nothing. It didn't seem to matter to the bystanders. Nothing, far or near, that doesn't affect us matters. It is said that people didn't know about the Holocaust. May be. But I doubt it would have made any difference even if people knew. So, every thirty minutes a woman is raped in the Congo, and then raped again. We know; will it matter? Will anybody do anything? Did Nagasaki and Hiroshima teach us anything? Even as we speak war-heads are cocked and ready to be launched. We could raise our collective voices and e-mail politicians and tell them that, as human beings the rape and mutilations of women in the Congo goes to the core of our souls and that we demand they do something about it. Ninety-nine per cent of the time the e-mails go unanswered. It's as if we e-mailed a black hole. But, after all they do nothing for the homeless and the destitute in their countries (unless they were bankers) it would be disengenuous of us to expect any type of action for the victims of rape in the Congo. Sometimes we rise to the occasion but, most of the time, not much shames us. One thing equals another, reality equals virtual reality and viceversa. One shocking article equals another shocking article. For a nano second we're enraged, but then numbness comes back and we move on to another story; to our routines. We never pause for anything, except the self.

Posted by: lou pacella | October 29, 2008 01:08 AM


Dear Maurizio
that was awful....sure.
was that,maybe, because of all the infamous crimes(among the worst war crimes ever in the human war history )we've been responsible in the congo's neighbour country just 25 years before the episode you reported?what would you do if your baby were served as DOG MEAL?that wasn't the 13 aviators fault of course but they still came from a country were to be fascist is not a crime and you can go around with a mussolini pictures in your wallet invoking him to come back!we've been the real terrorist we BURN ALIVE kids and women.... to get eaten it's nothing compared with that!probably the hungry men were adolescents already at the time when the italians(good fellows?)did what they did.should i follow and remind you about all the shit the west countries have been capable to do in africa?
One things we could do nice.......we'd better shut the fucking up

Posted by: michele tamagnini | October 28, 2008 04:45 PM


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