Abruzzo: no warning – tragedy

passaparola_6-4-09.jpg
Text:
”Good day to you all!
Obviously there are not many words for providing a comment on what happened in the night: it’s a dramatic natural event. It’s not possible to do political speculation. It’s not possible to blame anyone: earthquakes are no-one’s fault, earthquakes happen. To find out where they happen with greater frequency there are studies and maps.
We have turned to a website on the Internet where you too can see straight away: http://zonesismiche.mi.ingv.it/mappa_ps_apr04/italia.html. If you go to look, you can see that Italy is subdivided into various zones in different colours that go from pale grey (the least dangerous) to dark blue (the most dangerous). And if I’m not mistaken, the dark blue is concentrated in the heart of Calabria and in the area in the South West of Sicily.
This tongue of red and violet that indicates the zones that come just below the blue zones in terms of danger go through Friuli, where in fact we had the devastating earthquake in 1976 with a thousand deaths, and then through the extreme South East of Umbria, the central part of Umbria, the central part of Abruzzo and the point of intersection between South East of Lazio the Western part of Molise and longitudinally the whole Eastern part of Campania right up to where it also covers half of Basilicata and a good part of Apulia and a little bit of Sicily.

...

Money stolen at the expense of the citizens

This is the method that we use in Italy so as not to take preventative action, in fact to facilitate disasters, even those that whether they are more or less predictable, are anyway unavoidable.
Every scandal and disaster in Italy has produced a case of bad practice: there was thieving after the earthquake in Campania, 62,000 billion lire, most of which disappeared into the pockets of the Campania politicians and the entrepreneurs from the North, as well as those of the Camorra: trial, Statute of Limitations, and among those defendants saved by the Statute of Limitations was Pomicino whom we are sending to Europe in the Popolo della Libertà (PDL) and the regional leader of the Udeur, who I think is called Fantini.
In the Valtellina, there was thieving in the reconstruction of the Valtellina. One of the councillors who was thieving is one of Formigoni’s main collaborators.
Missione Arcobaleno {Rainbow Mission}: there was thieving even for the emergency of the Albanians immigrants. The Civil Protection, unfortunately, is often this stuff.
However, this is the first disaster in the Internet era. It is the first big disaster to happen in Italy with the Internet to illuminate it. I don’t have Messianic expectations of the Internet, however I do think that it is a basic tool. I think that it will be a bit more difficult to speculate in the same proportions as other times; I think that every citizen, especially in Abruzzo, is engaged as of today in checking that these people who have died must not become a “business” for the usual well known people and I think that everyone must keep their eyes open and become a bit of an informer every time they get wind of something, some thieving that is done at the expense of those who died in the night.
Spread the word. Passate parola."

PS. Tomorrow, 7 April, for the XV International United Nations Day for the Genocide in Rwanda, the “Associazione Bene Rwanda Onlus” {Organisation for Rwanda} is organizing a torch-light gathering in Rome’s Piazza Farnese at 4:30 pm and an event at the Teatro Piccolo Eliseo starting from 6:00 pm.

Posted by Beppe Grillo at 05:34 PM in | Comments (3) | Comments in Italian (translated) Post a comment | Sign up | Send to a friend | | GrilloNews | listen_it_it.gifListen |
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I wish to espress my sadness at this tragic time for the people of Italy and especially Aquila. I hope that all Italians will rise up and change the system which has allowed even greater tragedy to hit its people due to the lack of proper process when building, protecting, managing its buildings,its hospitals, its towns etc etc. How is it that Italy is so forward thinking in many ways and yet more and more is starting to resemble a 3rd world country in many aspects?

Posted by: carmen La Cava | April 8, 2009 12:34 PM


One of the things I look forward when I come to Italy is the bus trip that takes me from Rome, across the Appenines and then home along the Adriatic coast. Along the route, I always marvel at the ancient towns in the distance perched on impossible mountain tops and cliffs. Then about half-way home, L'Aquila comes into view. From a broad mountain top, the city descends gently towards the highway as if running to greet you and invite you in. Although I know L'Aquila from passing, I consider it the most welcoming city in the world. Late Sunday evening when I heard about the earthquake the news left me in disbelief and the next day when I saw the images of the calamity I felt immense sadness. The earthquake practically destroyed the city. I thought of the victims and reflected on their absurd fate. And thought as beautiful as Italian cities are, they're every bit as fragile. But, do they need to be? Or are Italians poor stewards of their incredibly beautiful country? Too many monuments, walls are plastered with ugly graffitis, too many streets, roads, highways lack proper maintainance, garbage strewn everywhere, industrial plants dumping toxic waste in rivers, releasing super toxic pollutants in the air, too many industrialists and builders are oblivious of doing the right thing. How is it possible to have schools collapse onto students? Or a nine-year old boy attacked and killed by roving packs of dogs? How many workers will die reconstructing the steeple of San Bernardino da Siena? Or in the re-construction of the city? What does this have to do with the earthquake that rocked L'Aquila? Shoddy construction of the hospital caused it to make it useless when needed the most. Building codes are not being implemented, safety rules are not enforced in the workplace. Italians have a lassaize-faire attitude about most things-not, only in economic terms. And it is this lassaize-faire attitude that makes Italians bad stewards of a piece of land on the planet with the highest concentration of humanity's history.

Posted by: louis pacella | April 7, 2009 11:37 PM


I want to give my condolences to all the people of Aquila. How sad!

Posted by: grace | April 7, 2009 09:25 AM


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