Get moving Prodi, starting now...

Prodi.jpg

The Unione has won. After a sober glass of spumante we ask our employee Romano Prodi to start work straight away from tomorrow morning beginning with the incinerators. Get moving Prodi.

Dear President of the Council, Romano Prodi,

The production of energy by incinerating refuse, happening in the face of protests in Europe today, is strongly supported by State money because it benefits improperly from the so-called Cip 6 designed to benefit “renewable resources”. We pay for this in our electricity bills. Without Cip 6, the production of energy from refuse would have no economic advantage with respect to renewable sources.

The same European Commission, led by yourself in 2003 with the EU Commissioner for Transport and Energy, Loyola De Palacio, in reply to a question from the European MP Monica Frassoni, on 20.11.2003 (reply E-2935/03IT) repeated the “no” of the EU to the extension of the regime of European support to developing renewable energy sources according to the Directive 2001/77, to the incineration of the non biodegradable parts of refuse. The following is the text of the statement of the Energy Commissioner in 2003: “The Commission confirms that, according to the definition of article 2, letter b) of the directive 2001/77/CE of the  European Parliament and of the Council, of  27 September 2001, the promotion of electrical energy produced from renewable sources in the internal electricity market, the non-biodegradable fraction of the refuse cannot be considered a source of renewable energy.”

A study carried out by the Bocconi University in 2005 demonstrated that the cost of 1 MWh produced by a medium sized hydro electric power station is equal to 66 Euro and this goes down to 63 Euro if the energy is produced using wind power. It goes up to 121 Euro if produced from Biomass and arrives at 280 Euro if from photovoltaics. Incineration of solid urban refuse with the “recuperation of energy” without considering the cost of management and the handling of the refuse and the damage to human health caused by the nano particles, before it arrives at the incinerator is 228 Euro per MWh.

This means that if the Cip 6, that we pay for through our Enel bills, were to go to sources that are truly renewable, in Italy it would be cheaper to go for solar power rather than for incinerators.

If State funding were to go to truly renewable sources and not to refuse, the production of electricity from the so-called CDR {Combustibile da rifiuti or Combustible from Refuse} and using incinerators that are improperly termed only in Italy "Termovalorizzatori" {Heat Extractors} would have no economic advantage.  They would not be attractive to the citizens nor to the companies that choose to produce energy through this system and to get rid of refuse using incineration.

Furthermore, the incinerators especially the new generation ones, as demonstrated by the research carried out by dottor Stefano Montanari and dottoressa Antonietta Gatti produce really dangerous inorganic nanoparticles (Pm 2.5 to Pm 0.01) that penetrate into the blood and from there are distributed to the organs of the human body where they form deposits and cause serious illnesses like cancer. These are the so-called nanopathologies.

These nanodusts are created at the very high temperatures that are generated. A story already seen in the Enel generating station using oil at Porto Tolle (where Tatò, Scaroni and Enel were condemned and ordered to pay out 3 million Euro in compensation). This was also seen in those coming back from Kosovo and Iraq (the so-called “Gulf Syndrome” caused by depleted uranium missiles or by tungsten). It was seen in the collapse of the Twin Towers in New York and in the industrial zones. Even some antiparticulate filters are suspected of producing the dangerous nanoparticles.

As the first action of your Government we therefore ask you to:

- respect European directives to immediately abolish financing  of the incineration of refuse as it is not a renewable source of energy. As in other countries of Europe, the incineration of refuse should be taxed and according to us should be forbidden.

- abolish the “Delegation Law” on the environment established by the Berlusconi Government which among other things, provides for an incinerator in every Province as well as the elimination of many controls and ways of protecting the environment and thus of protecting health.

- be decisive about the management of the whole cycle of refuse management. Reduce the source of refuse by taxing those who produce more packaging. Give incentives to those who encourage reuse and work towards the reduction of refuse, and the differentiated collection. Make this obligatory in the whole of Italy as it is in Germany. For handling residual waste, use modern systems of “cold” biological treatments that is without incineration as has already been experimented in other parts of Europe as well as in Sydney in Australia. As well as not producing nanoparticles, they cost about 75% less than the incineration plants.

- give legal recognition to the danger of nanoparticles (Pm 2.5 to Pm 0.01) as various researchers have been asking the Commission of the European Parliament to do.

We want change. For now, we trust you.

Beppe Grillo and the  bloggers

Posted by Beppe Grillo at 11:26 AM in | Comments (38)
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Comments

Who made the ferry tale, that incineration is a renewable energy? That what burns from the waste is converted oil. Since which time, oil is renewable? And incineration give rise to new production of the burned materials with a big input of energy! In the eco- balance, incineration brings a big loss of energy. Good recycling like kryo- recycling is an alternative:
http://www.buendnis-zukunft.de/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=174

Posted by: Felix Staratschek | January 3, 2009 05:28 PM


Im not italian, but its a great article

Posted by: Carla Gue | December 12, 2007 06:31 PM


Im no italian but, its a great article!!

Posted by: alternative pancreatic cancer | December 12, 2007 06:28 PM


Italy is doomed, no matter who is at the government.
Unfortunately, the wind of change is not blowing and, what is worse, Italians are just passive and whiny.
In 10-15 years Italy will have become like South America or the Midle East.
The worse is yet to come guys.

Posted by: Stephanie Noble | April 20, 2006 10:38 PM


"The perception of legality for a large fraction
of Italians is blurred"
That's the main problem!
The "Mafia" is not only the organized crime, is not only Provenzano, "Mafia" is a mind, is a way of life, and that's is our enemy.
Let's start to rise up against this "Mafia", like people in Sicily, who shouted "ASSASSINO" to Provenzano.
We must refuse the MAFIA and mafia's mentality.

Posted by: Raffaella Biferale | April 12, 2006 07:41 PM


Dear Maena,

Thanks for your answer. Two were the morals of my little story:

1) modern organized crime requires money technology and wide connectivity (hard to get
in Corleone). Provenzano, now, might be only a smaller fish. I also noticed that the elephant
uses the term "signor" with the New Prime minister (Prodi). Falcone used to say that in mafia
language "signor" is the title a boss uses to insult a public officer.


2) The perception of legality for a large fraction
of Italians is blurred and this does not discourage the elephant to try to bend the rules.

maybe my previous message sounded scary
but it was more a warning.

cheers,
Pippo (my nick name) or
Michele Zanolin
(you can google me on the web).


Posted by: michele zanolin | April 12, 2006 07:13 PM


Hello to English readers !

The one who think that the BASTA article of the Economist makes sense and was impartial shall maybe look at the news of this morning out of Italy. And this because abroad you read what the editors choose to make you aware of. I give you a couple of Italian impartial news of this morning that you will never read on the Economist :
- 30'000 original voting ballots out of 187'000 of a Swiss voting center are missing. And may not be the only ones for which it will impossible to recount. But the declaration of results of the vote have been filled and handed in. Mainly votes for the left obviously.
- In the city of Rome several thousands original voting ballots have been found in the trash. And for sure more will be found all over the place ...

Considering that the reds won by 25'000, and it will be impossible to recount votes, what should I think about Prodi's "victory" ? Will foreigner newspapers say anything about this or will they simply say that Berlusconi is not a fair looser because he is asking to verify what happened ?
Best regards from Switzerland

Posted by: Fabrizio Ferrari | April 12, 2006 02:39 PM


heheheheheheh Blisco!
very funny!
If you need suggestions about spaghetti's recipes, please ask to me: I'm the best amatriciana & carbonara's cook in the world (!) ;-)

Posted by: Raffaella Biferale | April 12, 2006 12:36 PM


I want to share with you what The Guardian reported this morning. Enjoy:

A triumph of sorts as the professor beats the clown.
In the end, it turned out better than he must have feared at times during Italy's long, tense election night.
Yesterday, Romano Prodi seemed assured of a majority in both houses of parliament, though the fate of Italy's next government could rest on a knife edge in the senate and its very formation by the centre-left was last night challenged by Silvio Berlusconi.
The outcome was not the clear victory promised by opinion and exit polls, but it nevertheless represented a considerable triumph for a man whose genial manner and reasoned arguments were all but eclipsed during the campaign by the raucous, vulgar clowning of his opponent. Mr Prodi is an easy man to underrate. His nickname is "the Mortadella" because, like Italy's favourite pink sausage, he is agreeably bland and comes from Bologna.
But while "the Prof" - to give him his other nickname - may be regarded as having made a hash of his stint as president of the EU Commission, he has a 100% record of success in his homeland. He has twice taken on the intimidatingly populist Mr Berlusconi - first in 1996 - and twice emerged with the lion's share of votes and seats.
In the lower house of Italy's parliament, the Chamber of Deputies, he is guaranteed an ample majority of 50 seats because of a rule change made by Mr Berlusconi's government last year.
The centre-left Union won just 25,000 votes more than the rightwing House of Freedoms, but the new law provides the winning side with bonus seats to make sure it can legislate.
Mr Prodi's problems start in the upper house, which has the same powers as the Chamber of Deputies. There, different rules apply and the centre-left was looking at a tiny, two-seat majority of the elected senators.
But a further idiosyncrasy of Italy's political system is that not all its senators are elected. Seven are named for life. But most can be expected to vote for Mr Prodi if necessary, so his real majority in the upper house should be about six.
That Mr Prodi's majority should be so slim is evidence of the effectiveness of Mr Berlusconi's crassly populist tactics in the final stage of the campaign.
Whether it was his offensive language, his improbable claims to be a victim of an establishment plot, or his equally improbable promises of tax cuts, something worked. He succeeded in trimming a 3.5 to 5 percentage point advantage in the polls to virtually nothing by election day.
The fact that his party, Forza Italia, remains Italy's biggest should be enough to assure his survival, at least for the moment, as leader of the right. At 69, he does not have much time in which to wrest back power, but he should have plenty of opportunities.
If, as expected, Mr Prodi is appointed to head the next government, a narrow majority in the upper house will not be his only headache. On the one hand, the Union's programme commits it to "radical reforms" aimed at improving Italy's flagging competitiveness.
On the other, the election results showed the parties on the left which did best were those least keen on those "radical reforms".
Communist Refoundation - led by Fausto Bertinotti, a former trade unionist who dresses like an English country gentleman - wants to follow France by ditching a law that introduces short-term employment contracts.
But Mr Bertinotti can expect stiff resistance from the rightwing of the Union, who want to shape it into something like the US Democratic party.
In his latest film, The Cayman, the director Nanni Moretti compares Mr Berlusconi to the deadly reptile of that name.
If the centre-left does fall to squabbling, it will not be long before Italy's ruthless billionaire statesman eases himself off the mud and moves in for the kill.
That might just provide the winners of this contest the incentive they need to stick together.
The desire for survival is a great unifier.
Playing by the rules
Some 3.5 million Italian citizens living abroad, who were given the right to vote in the election for the first time, helped Mr Prodi's government to victory. Four of the six overseas seats went to his Union coalition, one to Silvio Berlusconi's conservative allies and one to an independent party. The four seats gave Mr Prodi's forces 158 seats.
The balance of power in the Senate, however, may also depend on a group of aging Life Senators who are appointed "for outstanding merits in the social, scientific, artistic or literary field" and includes former presidents. Among them are Giulio Andreotti, 87, who was prime minister of Italy seven times and has been repeatedly accused of having ties to the Mafia, and who is likely to side with the right, and Nobel prize winner Rita Levi-Montalcini, who is likely to side with the left, and law professor and former president of Italy Francesco Cossiga, who is regarded as a "wild card" and may go to the left or right.
The turnout was extremely high, with 84% of those eligible to vote casting their ballots. Polls were also open for two days, instead of the usual one. Exit polls and surveys that failed to predict the outcome have been criticised by both sides.
Under Italian law, polls were not allowed to be published during the last two weeks of the campaign and many people relied on a poll before the blackout which gave the left a lead of 3.5% to 5%, a margin that was dramatically cut. Mr Berlusconi prompted laughter when he broke the rule a few days before polling, revealing he had called women working on sex chat lines and that seven out of nine he spoke to preferred him.

Posted by: Maria-Cristina Piras | April 12, 2006 11:52 AM


- Moreno, I didn't run away from Italy because of people like Berlusconi, I run away to try to be rich like him.Unfortunately or fortunately I'm not rolling in money and I'm not off my rocker enough;-)

- Finally, Maena, I'm one of those who saved Italy from I don't know what, but I save it:-)
John Lucky (Gianluca) you are lucky, with your vote or without, the result would be the same:-)

- Margeret-Rose, I think you have a chance too because the less we say about and the better it is:-)...But to know more about, better to go here: www.ft.com (Financial time)

- Corrado, If I would be in your place in Bang cock I'd spend my time in another way. Forget it:-)

- Topo grigio, you relly seem to need a grey victory like a grey mouse:-)

- Raffa, never mind, I always do the contrary of what people is expecting:-)


- Luc, I think you are lucky too. Soon the bells of Easter will ring and you will forget it:-)

- Marco, I think that if you think what I think we will think the same thing even if you say it in italian. Happy easter!

- Cat, Nice name to play with mice and as you can see, politics it's a play between cats and mice. One starts to say: I'm the winner but is called Mortadella by some and Coglione by him self (Pillock). The other one says I am the winner, not him, but he lost his pants after he lost his temper and all his credibility and asks to count again how much he losts:-) Come again, the play is going on.

- Prince, I'm very pleased to come for a spaghetti party. I'll come with the wine. I always come with.As you saw, my votes were not enough. Even if I try to make an agreement with my exes, I will have only 11 tickets to vote for the next time. Do you think it will be enough or is better to do a football team instead?

- Pippo, you seem to write a good scenario for the next film. Now that the union in power is the left, as they are supposed not to do like the right union, they can leave Provenzano mafioso to go home for another 40 years:-)

- Blisco, stop to make the cricket now. You are here in the Grillo's blog and the comic it's him.
...In fact, it's time to cook my spaghettis since my wife went away for one month. Bye bye

Posted by: blisco jajo | April 12, 2006 11:52 AM


voelvo scrivere un piccolo contributo e prsonale al tanto parlare di e ringraziare gli italiani all'estero...

penso che oltre alle famiglie degli interessati 'migranti professionisti', che condividono , seppur a malincuore, le scelte dei loro pargoli di stabilirsi all'estero, la questione di 'noialtri' espatriati dovrebbe siscitare interesse, ammirazione ma pure preoccupazione...perche siamo tanti, scontenti, inkazzati, forse un tantino codardi, ma piu vulnerabili all'immagine del nostro Bel Paese, proprio perche ne percepiamo i cambiamenti a distanza, in modo piu variegato e quindi con meno pregiudizi.

comprendo anche l'ambivalenza e la crisi, lo 'split' degli italiani in patria, alcune care amiche che ho sentito 'vacillare' di recente, ed anche questo malessere e' da considerare...

noi ci perdiamo tanto dell italia vivendo ad almeno 3000 km fisici e ad anni luce di life style (quasi sempre in peggio rispetto a quello italiano) dal Bel Paese.

Pero, il tempo passa , e veloce, e ci fa sperare e costruire, e belle cose ci succedono lasciando il senso di speranza intaccato, o quasi, che e' una cosa bella ed e' una cosa importante e forte...chi per conservarla decide di vivere lontano dai ricordi e dai propri cari, di perdersi la quotidianita' e la familiarita', fa una scelta molto personale e quindi poco recriminabile, e che spesso non ha molto a che vedere con la retorica del 'ma non ti manca la pasta fatta da tua mamma? e il sole, e il mare?

ho imparato inq uesti anni a vedere in un atteggiamento tanto superficiale il riflesso ineluttabile del populismo del nostro (ex) signorotto mediatico, illustrissimo Cavaliere da strapazzo, che ha svenduto stereotipi quando c'e'ra disperato bisogno d'altro, all ' estero e in patria...

se sempre piu giovani accettano questa sfida allo stesso tempo dimostrando di 'esserci per l Italia' nei momenti che 'contano', direi che i governi presenti e futuri dovranno cominciare a riflettere sul nostro fenomeno, un po come Bush sta facendo i conti, suo malgrado, e in modo contestabile, con la popolazione hispanica negli stati uniti, da migranti a 'cittadini americani' loro, da 'migranti di lusso' a 'italiani coi controcoglioni' noi...

Buona giornata!

Posted by: marika preziuso | April 12, 2006 10:54 AM


...penso che oltre alle famiglie degli interessati 'migranti professionisti', che condividono , seppur a malincuore, le scelte dei loro pargoli di stabilirsi all'estero, la questione di 'noialtri' espatriati dovrebbe siscitare interesse, ammirazione ma pure preoccupazione...perche siamo tanti, scontenti, inkazzati, forse un tantino codardi, ma piu vulnerabili all'immagine del nostro Bel Paese, proprio perche ne percepiamo i cambiamenti a distanza, in modo piu variegato e quindi con meno pregiudizi.

comprendo anche l'ambivalenza e la crisi, lo 'split' degli italiani in patria, alcune care amiche che ho sentito 'vacillare' di recente, ed anche questo malessere e' da considerare...

noi ci perdiamo tanto dell italia vivendo ad almeno 3000 km fisici e ad anni luce di life style (quasi sempre in peggio rispetto a quello italiano) dal Bel Paese.

Pero, il tempo passa , e veloce, e ci fa sperare e costruire, e belle cose ci succedono lasciando il senso di speranza intaccato, o quasi, che e' una cosa bella ed e' una cosa importante e forte...chi per conservarla decide di vivere lontano dai ricordi e dai propri cari, di perdersi la quotidianita' e la familiarita', fa una scelta molto personale e quindi poco recriminabile, e che spesso non ha molto a che vedere con la retorica del 'ma non ti manca la pasta fatta da tua mamma? e il sole, e il mare?

ho imparato inq uesti anni a vedere in un atteggiamento tanto superficiale il riflesso ineluttabile del populismo del nostro (ex) signorotto mediatico, illustrissimo Cavaliere da strapazzo, che ha svenduto stereotipi quando c'e'ra disperato bisogno d'altro, all ' estero e in patria...

se sempre piu giovani accettano questa sfida allo stesso tempo dimostrando di 'esserci per l Italia' nei momenti che 'contano', direi che i governi presenti e futuri dovranno cominciare a riflettere sul nostro fenomeno, un po come Bush sta facendo i conti, suo malgrado, e in modo contestabile, con la popolazione hispanica negli stati uniti, da migranti a 'cittadini americani' loro, da 'migranti di lusso' a 'italiani coi controcoglioni' noi...

Buona giornata!

Posted by: marika preziuso | April 12, 2006 10:51 AM


...volevo fare un piccolo e modesto contributo personale al tanto parlare ( e al tanto ringraziarci) degli italiani all'estero...premetto che lo sono anche io...

penso che oltre alle famiglie degli interessati 'migranti professionisti', che condividono , seppur a malincuore, le scelte dei loro pargoli di stabilirsi all'estero, la questione di 'noialtri' espatriati dovrebbe siscitare interesse, ammirazione ma pure preoccupazione...perche siamo tanti, scontenti, inkazzati, forse un tantino codardi, ma piu vulnerabili all'immagine del nostro Bel Paese, proprio perche ne percepiamo i cambiamenti a distanza, in modo piu variegato e quindi con meno pregiudizi.

comprendo anche l'ambivalenza e la crisi, lo 'split' degli italiani in patria, alcune care amiche che ho sentito 'vacillare' di recente, ed anche questo malessere e' da considerare...

noi ci perdiamo tanto dell italia vivendo ad almeno 3000 km fisici e ad anni luce di life style (quasi sempre in peggio rispetto a quello italiano) dal Bel Paese.

Pero, il tempo passa , e veloce, e ci fa sperare e costruire, e belle cose ci succedono lasciando il senso di speranza intaccato, o quasi, che e' una cosa bella ed e' una cosa importante e forte...chi per conservarla decide di vivere lontano dai ricordi e dai propri cari, di perdersi la quotidianita' e la familiarita', fa una scelta molto personale e quindi poco recriminabile, e che spesso non ha molto a che vedere con la retorica del 'ma non ti manca la pasta fatta da tua mamma? e il sole, e il mare?

ho imparato inq uesti anni a vedere in un atteggiamento tanto superficiale il riflesso ineluttabile del populismo del nostro (ex) signorotto mediatico, illustrissimo Cavaliere da strapazzo, che ha svenduto stereotipi quando c'e'ra disperato bisogno d'altro, all ' estero e in patria...

se sempre piu giovani accettano questa sfida allo stesso tempo dimostrando di 'esserci per l Italia' nei momenti che 'contano', direi che i governi presenti e futuri dovranno cominciare a riflettere sul nostro fenomeno, un po come Bush sta facendo i conti, suo malgrado, e in modo contestabile, con la popolazione hispanica negli stati uniti, da migranti a 'cittadini americani' loro, da 'migranti di lusso' a 'italiani coi controcoglioni' noi...

Buona giornata!

Posted by: marika preziuso | April 12, 2006 10:47 AM


good!!!

Posted by: mtv200 | April 12, 2006 10:31 AM


Pippo,
I like your story.
Now imagine this one:
The center-left governs Italy trying to re-build the economy and the legality lost. (Confilct of interests, anti-trust for media, electoral law and so on...)
Meanwhile judges do independently their job and some people finally go to jail, where they belong to.
Meanwhile the Government passes laws, even more severe and strict, against MAFIA and people connected to it.
Meanwhile the Italian economy boosts......

It sounds to me like a very nice story. Let us work to make it happen.

See ya guys. M.G.


This evening I am flying to Italy. I am planning to wear my T-Shirt COGLIONE?...NO ORGOGLIONE


Posted by: maena gambaiani | April 12, 2006 10:18 AM


As I told it before: In Italy, you can turn to the left or you can turn to the right it wil be allways the same: You will have a penality to pay in any case.
Before the votations I was also thinking that some wanted to go back and some others wanted to go through to try to avoid penalities but the result is that everybody wants to run but nobody want to pay penalities :-)
It's looking like a huge blind path were people are waiting to know what direction to choose.
It could be a title for a new song :
No back, no through, no left, no few
wants to stay there but the result is the same : Immobilization and confusion.
Now, as italians can do very well, they are going to play trying to get out of there using tricks like to feint to go on one direction when they want to go in the opposite one while they are keeping an eye backward to prevent to have it in their back :-)
Of course, we can try to go by byke like Prodi shows here on the top but I don't think we will shun penalities, we will just get it later.
I just hope that the comedy will be good enough to laugh instead of to cry.


Posted by: blisco jajo | April 12, 2006 07:21 AM


Dear Grillo,
hear this story (obviously a fantasy one): assume that in reality the elefant is the master of puppets and that in Sicily some puppets did not push people enought as he wanted. To teach them a lesson he puts in jail the oldest one of the sicilian puppets (provenzano) ... like saying: "I'm sending back the boxes for the votes". I want more of them ...

all the best

Posted by: pippo confalonieri | April 12, 2006 02:59 AM


Guys,
we are missing our friend living in Dublin

Mr. M o b i l i t a z i o n e X P r o d i

Hey you man... you must be somewhere around drinking beer to Prodi health, eh?

Ciao a tutti Mae

P.S. Today myself and some of my friends got emails, msn messages and telephone calls thanking us for being Italians abroad. I feel like we made a piece of history.

----------------------------

@ Principe, please get soon into AIRE list.... just in case we need to go to vote any soon.

----------------------------

Posted by: maena gambaiani | April 11, 2006 11:04 PM


I am an Italian abroad ( NY-usa) and I actually didn't vote ( I feel
guilty about that too) but I am SOOOOO PROUD of all the Italians
in other countries.
Maybe is a lot easier for us to see Italy from a distance understanding what an imbarassment Berlusconi & company
had become for Italy.
I just hope now that him and his friends go straight to JAIL....
I'll vote for that!!
And to all those Italians who now feel betrayed and claim that they will leave Italy now and re-open their businesses in other countries ( maybe a third woorld country???!!??? ) well..... just go!!!!! please it was about time you F....ing left.
please leave us nice & honest people alone.
THANKS ( and take the dwarf with you since you like him so much.... ).
ITALIANS ABROAD RULE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
WE LEFT OUR COUNTRY BECAUSE OF PEOPLE LIKE BERLUSCONI!!
BUT WE DIDN"T TURN OUR BACK TO THE ONES THAT COULDN"T LEAVE......BE STRONG>>> THINGS DO GET BETTER.
PS
i think I'll come to italy next month to celebrate ( it has been a long time......)

Posted by: moreno visini | April 11, 2006 10:53 PM


Beppe, you lost the last opportunity to shut up and avoid to say stupid things about politics.

Prodi didn't win... it's a fake winner, the Stock Market went down today... I don't think this is a good victory.

Prodi's govern will die within 6 months... Let's do a thing: if I'm wrong, you'll drop my post in this blog (in 6 months' time)!

Posted by: Giovanni Puddu | April 11, 2006 08:51 PM


Martadellaman must do a lot of things:
We'll be on guard!
1#: the law against conflict of interest
2#: suppression of the Legge Biagi and his job insecurity
3# economic revival
PS)Your Amatriciana is very good!

Posted by: Raffaella Biferale | April 11, 2006 08:11 PM


Yes, Amatriciana.

And now, I want to see if the new government will change those laws regarding employment.
A lot of Italians are waiting for that and are staring at Prodi to see if he really cares about normal people that every day need to feed their family and put a roof over it.
This would be the first step toward stability.
The waste burners are a priority too but I believe that he should pick the issue of employment first because Italy is generating a new threshold of poverty.

Forza Mortadellaman!!!!!!!

Posted by: Giovanni Principe | April 11, 2006 07:51 PM


BERLUCONI STILL REFUSES TO ADMIT DEFEAT
I am very much concerned...

Posted by: Emmanuele Da Iglesias | April 11, 2006 07:44 PM


Amatriciana? ;-)

Posted by: Raffaella Biferale | April 11, 2006 07:24 PM


Good!
Raffa:
I now will throw the pasta in the pot.
The water is boiling and is already salted.
Marco Freschi:
Nice going but now translate it in English for the rest of the world's delight.

Ciao, Blisco & Mae!

Posted by: Giovanni Principe | April 11, 2006 05:57 PM


It's the first time that the italians abroad are voting for the general election! Many people here, Tremaglia at the top, thought they would vote for the center-right coalition, thinking of the typical emigrants with carton bag, guitar, spaghetti & mandolino! It was a great mistake! Thanks them the center left coalition won!!!!
THANK YOU VERY MUCH!!!!!!!

Posted by: Raffaella Biferale | April 11, 2006 04:39 PM


I don't want to bring anyone down, but here is an excerpt from FT.com:

Mr Prodi’s leftist coalition has squeezed the result but with a margin so slim that Italy, the world’s third largest debtor, is the loser.

It's on it's way, but things aren't resolved yet.

Posted by: Cat Neilan | April 11, 2006 03:22 PM


Il 50% felice

Il 50% deluso

Il 100% delle persone, nel frattempo, si ritrova al governo gli stessi elementi del '96.
Ci ritroviamo Prodi, dopo Berlusconi, bollito nelle acque dell'IRI dopo una brillante gestione di affari statali.


Ragazzi, se qui non ci diamo una mossa NOI, noi persone immerse nelle nostre piccole realt, di destra, di sinistra, di centro, andiamo tutti allo sfascio!

STIAMO TUTTI UNITI PERCHE' ABBIAMO NECESSARIAMENTE BISOGNO DI FORZA E SACRIFICIO NELLE SFIDE CHE AFFRONTEREMO COME PAESE

Come potremo affrontare i sistemi economici che fanno dell'assenza del diritto umano la forza competitiva se siamo ancora qui a litigare sulla propaganda di destra e sinistra?


Sono giovane
Grazie ai miei genitori sto bene
Ma sono molto preoccupato per la mancanza del sentimento che dovrebbe UNIRCI TUTTI


Un sincero saluto ai lettori di questo sfogo

Posted by: Marco Freschi | April 11, 2006 03:02 PM


Well done guys!

We made it we definitely saved their a@@.

Now will be interesting to see what will happen to our Bell Italia, did anybody noticed that as soon the Unione won the media blasted the news about Provenzano?This is disgusting as they kept this news in the fridge up to day just to add more confusion.

Posted by: Luc Esposito | April 11, 2006 02:47 PM


Margaret-Rose,
The percentages can be read here: http://www.ilcorriere.it

Posted by: blisco jajo | April 11, 2006 02:47 PM


Italians abroad: THANK YOU!!!!!!!!! :-)

Posted by: Raffaella Biferale | April 11, 2006 02:43 PM


GUYS WE MADE IT!

We made the difference THE ITALIANS abroad saved italians' @ss.

It is official

Lower Chamber: Prodi's coalition 49.8%, 340 seats

Berlusconi coalition 49.7%, 277 seats

Higher Chamber: Prodi's coalition 48.9%, 1 independent that will cooperate with Unione, 158 seats

Berlusconi coalition 50.2%, 156 seats


They made the law, they are paying the price.

CHI LA FA L'ASPETTI.

Have a great day,

M.G.

Posted by: maena gambaiani | April 11, 2006 02:39 PM


So after Thailand also Italy is now gone.

Not anymore a real government but just a technical crazy assemble.

I didn't expect that! This reflect perfectly what the Italian people think about politicians...

All of them are sh.... and no one know really who vote for. Now Italy it is exactly divided fifty fifty but not because 50% want this party and 50% want the other but because 100% of Italians do not like what is present nowadays so 50% decided for what they think is the minor evil.
With such a sharp and equal division it is nearly impossible for a country go anywhere whatever colour is the leadership.
This is the worst mess for Italy and its economy.
Confusion, total lack of a real democracy and real new politicians, this is the scenario.

As you know I live abroad but I do vote and I feel myself so sad for Italy and Italians that once more have not been able to really start a real change.

2000 years of democracy... and I had 4 symbols on my certificate to choose.

In Thailand (what most of you consider a 3 world country) was so unexpected for me to see people in Bangkok protesting against the regime, also after that the election confirmed the prime minister.
I know the Thai culture a little and for sure I have a lot to learn about also if I live here since 3 years already. Right now they have not set yet the new government because it is nearly impossible to set the same prime minister without a violent turmoil in the country.

In France the people protesting make the government change the law !

Where are Europe going?
What are doing Italy?
What are we waiting for?
Waiting other USA bombs on the next ENEMY?

Doing Noting?

It is time to change and send them home!!!

Posted by: Corrado Prever | April 11, 2006 12:40 PM


i am an italian living abroad, haven`t voted for 10 years this was the one for the only reason of beeing against that... dorian gray....

Posted by: gianluca muci | April 11, 2006 12:34 PM


i am an italian living abroad, haven`t voted for 10 years this was the one for the only reason of beeing against that... dorian gray....

Posted by: gianluca muci | April 11, 2006 12:34 PM


It's TRUE, then ? -- vero ? Where can I find an English language site that will summarise the results for me ... anyone ? Please ?

Posted by: Margaret-Rose STRINGER | April 11, 2006 12:33 PM


i am an italian living abroad, haven`t voted for 10 years this was the one for the only reason of beeing against that... dorian gray....

Posted by: gianluca muci | April 11, 2006 12:33 PM


The Italians abroad saved Italy.

Well done!

M.G.

Posted by: maena gambaiani | April 11, 2006 12:25 PM


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