Nostalgia for Chernobyl

A conference was organised by Greenpeace, Legambiente and WWF in Rome on 19 April to mark 20 years since the Chernobyl tragedy. It aimed to examine the real costs and the current situation of nuclear energy.

According to the International Energy Agency (IEA) nuclear energy contributes only 6.5% of primary energy and it is forecast to fall to 4.5% by the year 2030.
Nuclear energy is the most costly energy source and it needs the most support from the State.

According to the United States Department of Energy (DOE) the cost of 1 KWh of electrical energy costs 6.13cent/$ from gas 4.96 cent/$, from coal 5.34 cent/$, from wind power 5.05 cent/$.
Similar results are presented by researchers at Chicago University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. These figures are underestimates because they do not include the costs of decommissioning the plant and the long term management of the waste products.

A false myth about nuclear energy is the abundance of uranium in nature. It is true that its presence is widespread, but it is normally found in infinitesimal quantities, so tiny as to not be practically usable. Reserves of uranium that can be extracted commercially could last for a period of about a century if consumption levels are kept at those for 2000. If we were to substitute nuclear fuel for all the fossil fuel to produce electricity that would need thousands of nuclear power stations and the consequent using up of reserves of uranium in just a few years.
And finally, not even nuclear power is exempt from carbon dioxide emissions. Just think of the fossil energy needed to construct the power stations, to extract, transport and enrich the uranium, to manage the waste products, and to dismantle the power stations at the end of their useful lives. Investing in nuclear power means wasting public and private resources whilst damaging the development of renewable sources and hindering technologies that increase energy efficiency.

But some people never stop thinking about it. Those with nostalgia for Chernobyl, never give up. Among these are Scaroni’s Enel that bought Slovenske Elektrarne and thus finally came back to nuclear when the second reactor at Mochovce was made operational.

From 1990 to 2005, the Austrians were trying to close down the first reactor and they even vetoed the entry of Slovakia into the European Union (Mochovce is only 100 km from Vienna).

The Austrian government installed scores of wind turbines on the border with Slovakia very visible to the naked eye, even as a sign of protest.

I propose that the Italian government installs a few wind turbines in front of the Rome HQ of Enel. Perhaps they have never seen any.

Posted by Beppe Grillo at 02:47 AM in | Comments (8)
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I think the world may just need a little crisis in energy. Maybe we need to run out of oil. ABSOLUTELY we should NOT turn to nuclear energy. I would much rather take pain in learning how to grow my own food and feed myself and my family than risk my child's life (as well as my own)just so I can convieniently run to the grocery store on any given day. If we keep ourselves educated and veer far from ignorance, we can survive. I do not want to depend on nuclear energy and risk cancer for salad greens and extra heat. Come on...have we really become that lazy?

Posted by: Heather Zanasca | September 16, 2007 11:52 PM


I think the world may just need a little crisis in energy. Maybe we need to run out of oil. ABSOLUTELY we should NOT turn to nuclear energy. I would much rather take pain in learning how to grow my own food and feed myself and my family than risk my child's life (as well as my own)just so I can convieniently run to the grocery store on any given day. If we keep ourselves educated and veer far from ignorance, we can survive. I do not want to depend on nuclear energy and risk cancer for salad greens and extra heat. Come on...have we really become that lazy?

Posted by: Heather Zanasca | September 16, 2007 11:50 PM


I think the world may just need a little crisis in energy. Maybe we need to run out of oil. ABSOLUTELY we should NOT turn to nuclear energy. I would much rather take pain in learning how to grow my own food and feed myself and my family than risk my child's life (as well as my own)just so I can convieniently run to the grocery store on any given day. If we keep ourselves educated and veer far from ignorance, we can survive. I do not want to depend on nuclear energy and risk cancer for salad greens and extra heat. Come on...have we really become that lazy?

Posted by: Heather Zanasca | September 16, 2007 11:50 PM


I think the world may just need a little crisis in energy. Maybe we need to run out of oil. ABSOLUTELY we should NOT turn to nuclear energy. I would much rather take pain in learning how to grow my own food and feed myself and my family than risk my child's life (as well as my own)just so I can convieniently run to the grocery store on any given day. If we keep ourselves educated and veer far from ignorance, we can survive. I do not want to depend on nuclear energy and risk cancer for salad greens and extra heat. Come on...have we really become that lazy?

Posted by: Heather Zanasca | September 16, 2007 11:50 PM


I think the world may just need a little crisis in energy. Maybe we need to run out of oil. ABSOLUTELY we should NOT turn to nuclear energy. I would much rather take pain in learning how to grow my own food and feed myself and my family than risk my child's life (as well as my own)just so I can convieniently run to the grocery store on any given day. If we keep ourselves educated and veer far from ignorance, we can survive. I do not want to depend on nuclear energy and risk cancer for salad greens and extra heat. Come on...have we really become that lazy?

Posted by: Heather Zanasca | September 16, 2007 11:49 PM


Whoops! In my previous question I forgot to specify if you are ready to do it in ITALY, where laws are so enforced and safety measures so rigorous..... ;-);-)

Posted by: Raffaella Biferale | April 25, 2006 11:48 AM


Blisco, I thnik there are more solutions than nuclear to prevert this scenario, even if we must in any case drastically reduce our energie consumes....
Anyway, I have a question to nuclear's upholders of all sorts: would you be ready to live near a nuclear power station? Would you be ready to let your children play near radioactive waste disposals?
Someone should do it, at least!

Posted by: Raffaella Biferale | April 25, 2006 11:41 AM


I don't want to say that I like nuclears cause there is too much sensitive people here but it's maybe helpfull for some to know that in maybe 2 or 4 years there will be no oil anymore. This it means not only the end of the traditional cars and engines but also a very serious problem about electricity which is actually produced with oil components.I would want to see at that time how many people will be against at that moment.Imagine your self in winter without heating and without lamps, computer, TV...
Imagine also that agricultors will have to go back like in the middle age to grow something without machines and that your salads and fresh vegetable will be very difficult to find in your supermarket.
Better to start to collect plastic bags now that they are free and grow home vegetables instead of flowers:-)

Posted by: blisco jaio | April 25, 2006 10:23 AM


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