Mastella from Ceppaloni

mastella.jpg

Mario Clemente Mastella had a difficult birth as his digestive apparatus was already well formed. In 1947 he was born in Ceppaloni a place in the Province of Benevento that has been exposed to national visibility thanks to him. From that moment the following phrase came into common parlance: “No Ceppaloni, no party”. His legendary fame leads him to participate in baptism and confirmation parties without invitation. His capacity to be laid back allows him to eat his full and at the same time to make numerous friendships that will serve him in the future.

His appetite led him unfailingly to the Christian Democrats. He became an eating participant in 1976 and he hasn’t left the table since. Every government coalition has seen him present at the sharing out of the armchairs. In fact no one invited him, but in the end they give him something to eat when he threatens to go to another party.
He celebrated his exhibition as Minister of Work in the Berlusconi Government. He resolved the serious drama of youth unemployment in the South as well as pensions.

However, his declaration of pre-marital virginity was ambiguous and full of double meaning. It has never been really clarified what type of sexual relationship he was referring to.

In 1999 he went it alone and founded the UDEUR that he defined as: “The centre of politics, a project for the future, an idea, a path, a method, a story, an identity” and with a note in the margin, a place at the table. He immediately was in conflict about the menu with Romano Prodi and coherently made the following declaration at the last Primaries for the Unione: “We will leave the Unione. From today we will be the Centre allied to the Unione.”

To give life and strength to this project he inserted in the list the convict Rocco Salini. The Unione changed the menu and Mastella came back to the Unione.

After the April elections his enormous appetite sent him into a delirium. He demanded three Ministries including the Ministry of Defence, the Vice Presidency of the Council and 30% of the snacks of the Council of Ministers. On the latter item he was in conflict with Massimo D’Alema and had to take a step back. Prodi, who has always secretly appreciated his capacity to get by, after telephoning Gianni Letta to check his credentials, he nominated him Minister of Justice.
Sic transit gloria prodi.

Posted by Beppe Grillo at 10:24 AM in | Comments (8)
Post a comment | Sign up | Send to a friend | | GrilloNews | TrackBack (0) |
View blog opinions



Comments

Ciao my name is jon and i live here in the usa however my mom was bon and raised there in ceppaloni she left in 1947 after marrying an american . We returned to italy when i was young for a vist and i will return to see ceppaloni although it looks to me that it ha grown since my vist in 1970 i remember as we were driveing into town the first words my mom said were when she saw the fountain were they finaly have a fountain when she was there they had to walk some distance to bring water back to town . My mother as passed on almost 2 years now and miss her and long to know as much about the town she was born and rasied in so if you can send pictures and information to me and stay in touch hat would be bella i would also like to meet and write to some of the ladies of ceppolina . GOD BLESS and i hope to hear from you soon . ciao jon

Posted by: jon paul donisi kail | November 18, 2008 04:30 AM


I've been this year in Italy as an Erasmus and I've to say that I love this land. It's a beautiful country, food and wine are fantastic and people are generally very nice and kind. It's a brilliant place to have a holiday.
But I'm simply astonished about how low standards you Italians have in all things public. I understand that the burden of tangentopoli or such can't be wiped off too fast or easily, but at least you could try. I know you love to protest and voice your anger, but unfortunately it seems to happen only when it causes you directly. If Italians go to the streets it must have to do with pay rises, pensions or job protection. That is usually as civic as it gets here. Do you seriously think that troops in Iraq and that evil Biagi law are the biggest of your problems?
The newest Economist -if not lying completely- had it that Mastella is a personal friend of Francesco Campanella, a man who was a close associate to no one else but Mr Provenzano. And he's to be your new minister of justice? Va bene.
I will leave tomorrow, and I will leave for Albania. I'm sure it'll be a beautiful country as well, and maybe has even some prospects of someday becoming a decent 21st-century society. Of today's Italy I wouldn't be that optimistic.
Arrivederci, tamarros of Europe.

Posted by: Aapo Markkanen | May 23, 2006 05:07 PM


I've been this year in Italy as an Erasmus and I've to say that I love this land. It's a beautiful country, food and wine are fantastic and people are generally very nice and kind. It's a brilliant place to have a holiday.
But I'm simply astonished about how low standards you Italians have in all things public. I understand that the burden of tangentopoli or such can't be wiped off too fast or easily, but at least you could try. I know you love to protest and voice your anger, but unfortunately it seems to happen only when it causes you directly. If Italians go to the streets it must have to do with pay rises, pensions or job protection. That is usually as civic as it gets here. Do you seriously think that troops in Iraq and that evil Biagi law are the biggest of your problems?
The newest Economist -if not lying completely- had it that Mastella is a personal friend of Francesco Campanella, a man who was a close associate to no one else but Mr Provenzano. And he's to be your new minister of justice? Va bene.
I will leave tomorrow, and I will leave for Albania. I'm sure it'll be a beautiful country as well, and maybe has even some prospects of someday becoming a decent 21st-century society. Of today's Italy I wouldn't be that optimistic.
Arrivederci, tamarros of Europe.

Posted by: Aapo Markkanen | May 23, 2006 05:06 PM


I want to give the neonato Unione government a chance, too, but I must say that it already is giving cause for dismay. Mastella! Uffa! Beppe's post is quite witty and enjoyable but it is not a good thing that this conservative is justice minister.

And what happened to Prodi's statement that Italian troops would leave Iraq in September? It has been reported here in the States that Prodi changed his mind after getting a phone call from the White House. Is he already capitulating to Bush?

Posted by: George De Stefano | May 19, 2006 06:22 PM


My dear Francesco!
You said I'm not practising what one preaches (predicare bene e razzolare male ! ;-). That's not true!!!!!!
I wrote the same on italian blog: I HATE MASTELLA, but I want to give a chance to Prodi's government. As I gave my vote to the left coalition, I knew that Mastella was there. What really matters is that Prodi set today his priorities: withdrawal of the troops from Iraq and abrogation of the Biagi law.
I want to trust him.
:-)

Posted by: Raffaella Biferale | May 18, 2006 09:12 PM


Hello Raffella good evening here too!!
So you speak well on italian post and "razzoleit" bad here nèh??

Posted by: francesco folchi | May 18, 2006 08:49 PM


Can you see the big face on the top of this post?
It is the face os an italian politician, the boss of a small party of Prodi's coalition parties.
He is a really strange one.
In Italy, mostly than other part of the world, the minority politics groups decide the politic/s of a coalition of politics parties!!
Help us please help us....A big group of italian (some from the right parties some from left ones) are prisoners of those men (?)....Please help us help us!!!! AAAAARRGGHHHHHH!!!!!

Posted by: francesco folchi | May 18, 2006 08:48 PM


I don't like Mastella at all. As far as I'm concerned he shouldn't be minister at all, less than ever justice minister!
But the link coalition needed him to win, and because of this we reached a compromis, partly because he was ready to subscribe our program.
For this reasons I think we must trust the new governemnt and give him a chance.

Posted by: Raffaella Biferale | May 18, 2006 01:38 PM


Post a comment


Beppe Grillo's Blog is an open space for you to use so that we can come face to face directly. As your comment is published immediately, there's no time for filters to check it out. Thus the Blog's usefulness depends on your cooperation and it makes you the only ones responsible for the content and the resulting outcomes.

Information to be read before using Beppe Grillo's Blog

The following are not allowed:
1. messages without the email address of the sender
2. anonymous messages
3. advertising messages
4. messages containing offensive language
5. messages containing obscene language
6. messages with racist or sexist content
7. messages with content that constitutes a violation of Italian Law (incitement to commit a crime, to violence, libel etc.)

However, the owner of the Blog can delete messages at any moment and for any reason.
The owner of the Blog cannot be held responsible for any messages that may damage the rights of third parties Maximum comment length is 2,000 characters.
If you have any doubts read "How to use the blog".

Post a comment (English please!)


First name and Surname*:

Email Address*:
We remind you that anonymous messages (without real first name and surname) will be cancelled.
URL:


* Compulsory fields



Send to a friend

Send this message to *


Your Email Address *


Message (optional)


* Compulsory fields