Work is a killer

ThyssenKrupp.jpg
photo from Leggonline.it

Yesterday at the ďalla ScalaĒ opera house, one minuteís silence was observed in honour of those that were burned alive at the Turin steel manufacturing. Then, off we went with Wagner. State President Napolitano had just got back from the centenary celebrations for Mondadori, the writer DíAlemaís publishing house handed to the psychodwarf on a platter thanks to Previtiís corruption of certain judges.
The top leaders were there, together with models with long legs and balcony-style boobs. It would appear that Pertini rushed to the serious burn unit of the Turin hospital. It is said that he spent the night with the families. However, 1500 dead per year is more than worth a night out at the Scala.
The Government should call a special meeting of the Cabinet in order to implement urgent measures to improve workplace safety, however, this is a government that does not even have the courage to receive the Dalai Lama. When people die as a result of empty fire extinguishers and 16-hour shifts, the factory owner should be summarily thrown into jail, without passing go, and the factory should be shut down temporarily. The current centre-left Government, with its two trade unionists in the Chamber and the Senate, and its trade unionist Minister of Labour, is making us hanker back to the days of Berlusconi.
They are at each otherís throats for days on end because one soldier is killed in Afghanistan, a soldier who should not have been therein the first place, while ignoring a slaughter that has been going on for two years now. Why is this? I donít know what the answer is. The Maroni Law has only increased the danger, because the temporary worker who is employed for only a few months does not have adequate time to learn the job, while the employer has no interest whatsoever in investing in any form of training. This flood of illegal immigrants, who are often the first to become victims and who are never legalised simply because it is not worthwhile. In the morning, the person who is unemployed doesnít get to eat, but the one who is employed, leaves his family in order to go and risk his life. The odds of getting a visit from the inspectors are the same as those of winning the Superenalotto, one chance in every thirty years. We are absolutely top of the list in Europe as regards fatal accidents. In its latest report, the Transparency International organisation places Italy in second place in Europe in terms of the corruption of political parties, our only saving grace being Bulgaria. Top of the list for work related deaths and second for corrupt parties, could there just perhaps be some link?

Posted by Beppe Grillo at 10:55 PM in | Comments (10)
Post a comment | Sign up | Send to a friend | | GrilloNews | TrackBack (0) |
View blog opinions



Comments

It's easy for those who don't live in Italy to come to her defense from the comforts of a penthouse on Park Avenue or wherever . . . Giancarlo, you're excused for having forgotten what it's like to live here -- thirty years is indeed a long time.

In any case, venting anti-German spleen avoids the issue of Italy being Numero Uno in Europe in workplace fatalities. Italian authorities clearly have sole jurisdiction over workplace safety regulations and enforcement of businesses operating within the Italian borders (yes Giancarlo, even those owned by Germans). The Germans, unfortunately can't be blamed for this particular problem.

The statistics on workplace safety added to the site today highlight the problem.

Posted by: Dave de Andrade | December 17, 2007 02:25 PM


As an Italian who's been living overseas for over 30 years, I must thank Beppe Grillo for the important social actions (and criticisms) he is pursuing. However, the link to Hearsay International ... oops, sorry! Transparency International is disconcerting. A modicum of checking of materials and methods used by this self-appointed group of international integrity would have shown how no reliable conclusions can be claimed by "Hearsay International": their methodology is hopelessly flawed. There is no space here for details but, trust my experience in scientific research, nothing sensible can be said with the data they claim to have gathered. In the long run this facile usage of unreliable information hurts your credibility and that of your cause(s). It offers opportunities for foreigners to indulge in their favourite pastime, Italian-bashing: never loose an opportunity to claim Italians are a bunch of useless fools that can't ever get anything working right. After 30 yrs experience of Anglo-Saxon culture I guarantee you that this still happens regularly. See the comments by Dave who, after venting his anti-Italian spleen, seems to be arguing that the blame for the horrific tragedy at the Turin steel mill rests on the shoulders of the Italians. Funny, I'm sure I read somewhere or other that the steel mill was a ThyssenKrupp plant. Now, last time I checked, ThyssenKrupp was a multinational with headquarters in Stuttgart so, the only blame the Italians had was to be so desperate for a job that they were prepared to work in that hell-hole. Now, I can quite agree that empty extinguishers should have been checked/spotted by some kind of National inspectorate or other but, surely, the responsibility rests with a greedy management that was in the process of pillaging the last of the steel mill resourses to send the profits back to Stuttgart. But now, these "big cheeses" are sitting in Germany, not in Milan. Are they not? Milan is not the only place with unbreathable air

Posted by: giancarlo contrafatto | December 15, 2007 08:32 PM


As an Italian who's been living overseas for over 30 years, I feel that I must thank Beppe Grillo, whose shows I never had the pleasure of viewing, for the important social actions (and criticism of the political class) he seems to be pursuing. I must, however, sound a warning regarding his indiscriminate use of unchecked references. The link/reference to "Hearsay International" ... oops, sorry! "Transparency International" is, to say the least, disconcerting. I'm sure that this reference was inserted in good faith but a modicum of checking of the materials and the methods used by this self-appointed group of international integrity wouldn't have gone amiss. Had Beppe Grillo done so, he would have realized that none of the conclusions claimed by "Hearsay International" are reliable: the methodology is hopelessly flawed. There is no space here for me to go into details (perhaps I should make them the subject of a future blog) but, trust my long experience in scientific research, nothing sensible can be done/said with the data they claim to have gathered. In the long run, unfortunately, this kind of facile usage of unreliable information hurts your credibility and that of your cause(s). This is because it offers opportunities for foreigners to indulge in their favourite pastime: Italian-bashing. In other words, never loose an opportunity to say how Italians are a bunch of useless fools that can't ever get anything working right. Trust me again on this, after 30 yrs in an Anglo-Saxon country I guarantee you that this still happens ... regularly. See the comments by Dave who, after venting his anti-Italian spleen, seems to be arguing, with his brand of iron-clad logic, that the blame for the horrific tragedy at the Turin steel mill rests on the shoulders of the Italians. Funny, I'm sure I read somewhere or other that the steel mill was a ThyssenKrupp plant. Now, last time I checked, ThyssenKrupp was a multinational with headquarters in Stuttgart so, the only blame the Italians had was to be so desperate for a job that they were prepared to work in that hell-hole. Now, I can quite see, and even agree with, the argument that empty extinguishers should have been checked/spotted by some kind of National inspectorate or other but, surely, the responsibility must rest "in primis" with a greedy management that was in the process of pillaging the last of the steel mill resourses in order to send the profits back to Stuttgart. But now, these "big cheeses" are sitting in Germany, not in Milan. Are they not? Trust me Dave, Milan is not the only place with unbreathable air!

Posted by: giancarlo contrafatto | December 15, 2007 08:11 PM


The more or less collective illusion that many Italians share about being more socially egalitarian and progressive than the rest of the world seem to be just that -- an illusion -- and the Torino fire shines some light on the matter. As an American living in Italy, I can't say how many times people go out of their way to stress to me, sometimes subtlely and other times right in my face, that Italy is a very socially advanced country. I usually wonder whether the person is simply trying to convince himself of something that's obviously in doubt or is just trying to let me know that the U.S. is socially backward (not a difficult argument) and that Italy is superior in this regard (a difficult argument).

The contrast of workers fried alive while serving the interests of La Scala party-goers is a simple, poignant illustration of something pervasive in Italy. The fact that Italy leads Europe in work-related deaths shows that the Torino incident isn't an isolated one, just more publicized. Workers regularly dying painful and agonizing deaths in service to their elite "benefactors" who do nothing to change the situation is certainly not one of the hallmarks of a socially advanced country.

Thank you Beppe Grillo! You're like a breath of fresh air. (which is a very hard thing to find, literally and figuratively here in Milano).

Posted by: Dave de Andrade | December 14, 2007 10:18 AM


don't you think it's a combination of things. And it's a mindset that unfortunately I think will never be eradicated. Which is: whatever. boh.
I did't live in italy (ostia) that long, but got a big taste of the bureacracy. you get the feeling that people procure a job but then won't work efficiently. is this an attitude problem or is it just the culture? Then 2 hours in the afternoon OFF, and don't get me wrong it's awesome.. but it's the culture. If I lived there now I would be writing letters and protesting about the trains taking off and the government not taking safety seriously; but I probably would be the only one doing that, wouldn't i? so in the long run.. italy will have to pay the piper for her slowness her laziness and her sexism. (ah that's another subject but the balcony boobs says it all) thanks beppe

Posted by: gwendolyn carminati | December 13, 2007 07:01 PM


Work safety is important everywhere.

This commercial (on youtube) is being shown currently in the State of Victoria, Australia. I think is very pertinent.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pdQuXgoUGC8

Posted by: Guido Tresoldi | December 12, 2007 04:37 AM


Pertini was the best President I ever seen in my life.
Somebody should write a book about him to be studied in Italian schools to bring back our kids from hell.
Napolitano is a piece of shit.

Posted by: Giovanni Principe | December 11, 2007 02:14 PM


CHE SCHIFO

Posted by: MARCO COSTI | December 10, 2007 05:24 PM


A proposito di morti bianche e di morti sul lavoro, proprio ieri sera io e mio marito abbiamo avuto la triste notizia della morte di un nostro caro amico, Ť morto di leucemia. Si era ammalato un mese fa, la malattia non gli ha dato scampo.
E voi direte e questo che c'entra?
C'entra, c'entra, questo amico era una carabiniere, collega di mio marito, col quale avevano condiviso le missioni nei Balcani.
Che fine hanno fatto le inchieste sull'uranio impoverito? sui soldati che si stanno ammalando e che stanno morendo di leucemia?
Scompariranno in silenzio, come in silenzio hanno obbedito alla patria.

Posted by: maria luisa mazzetta | December 10, 2007 01:54 PM


the safety on work places in Italy will never
exist untill managers are appointed by Opus Dei,
Free Masons,political parties or other lobbies.
Running after the nearest responsible by policemen
or judges is the last thing to do, the first thing is to create a "top management" that considers his main task safety and environment
respect. Their actual approach is to allocate to somebody the responsibility without giving him the
authority to enter in the root causes of the possible unsafe process.

Posted by: maurizio confalonieri | December 10, 2007 05:29 AM


Post a comment


Beppe Grillo's Blog is an open space for you to use so that we can come face to face directly. As your comment is published immediately, there's no time for filters to check it out. Thus the Blog's usefulness depends on your cooperation and it makes you the only ones responsible for the content and the resulting outcomes.

Information to be read before using Beppe Grillo's Blog

The following are not allowed:
1. messages without the email address of the sender
2. anonymous messages
3. advertising messages
4. messages containing offensive language
5. messages containing obscene language
6. messages with racist or sexist content
7. messages with content that constitutes a violation of Italian Law (incitement to commit a crime, to violence, libel etc.)

However, the owner of the Blog can delete messages at any moment and for any reason.
The owner of the Blog cannot be held responsible for any messages that may damage the rights of third parties Maximum comment length is 2,000 characters.
If you have any doubts read "How to use the blog".

Post a comment (English please!)


First name and Surname*:

Email Address*:
We remind you that anonymous messages (without real first name and surname) will be cancelled.
URL:


* Compulsory fields



Send to a friend

Send this message to *


Your Email Address *


Message (optional)


* Compulsory fields